Horse in Banbury, Connecticut

Horse in Banbury, Connecticut

The Photograph:

Respite in Danbury, Connecticut

Introduction:

My Photo
Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

To view my page on the Edwin Mellen Press website, please click below:

Thank you for visiting. I hope you will find the information insightful. ~ Jeanne Iris

xo

28 April, 2014

Emily Dickinson and Iconic Realism

Portrait of Emily Dickinson painted by William Rock
Chinese calligraphy painted by Huang Xiang 
Click HERE to go to their site. 

(calligraphy is from Dickinson's "The Soul selects Her Own Society,"
"My Life Closed Twice Before Its Close" and "Presentiment")
by Emily Dickinson

Calligraphy Translation:
 
The soul selects her own society,
Then shuts the door;
On her divine majority
Obtrude no more.
Unmoved, she notes the chariot's passing
At her low gate;
Unmoved,
an emperor kneeling
Upon her mat.
I've known her from an ample nation
Choose one;
Then close the valves of her attention
Like stone.
I never saw a Moor

My life closed twice before its close;
It yet remains to see
If immortality unveil
A third event to me,
So huge, so hopeless to conceive,
As these that twice befell.
Parting is all we know of heaven,
And all we need of hell.

Presentiment
is that long shadow on the lawn
Indicative that sun goes down
The notice to the startled grass
That darkness is about to pass

By displaying the countenance of this reclusive poet in the midst of so many cultural icons, these two artists, Huang Xiang and William Rock, illustrate iconic realism of Emily Dickinson's poetry. In this painting by William Rock and the calligraphic representation by Huang Xiang, the iconic presence of Emily Dickinson's simplicity in connection with this honorable position illustrates her impact on human consciousness and the importance for humanity to look inward. Indeed, through her darkness, enlightenment has come to many. The use of blue and purple bring to mind the spirituality that surrounds this poet's expression: in her eyes, around the 'upper floor' of her mind and in her heart.

Chrysler Corp. Ad, "Imported from Detroit," and Iconic Realism (Click onto this title to view the ad.)

photo from Google images
"This is the Motor City, and this is what we do," states the singer, Eminem, in the Chrysler Corp. commercial aired for the first time during Super Bowl XLV.  In this commercial, a narrator defines luxury while the audience views a montage of iconic images of Detroit, Michigan, the "Motor City."

Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, where my father worked as a paint chemist for Chrysler, I must say that I was pretty proud of those images. Positive images juxtaposed with affirmative statements illustrate a contrary point of view to that which the current world media has presented of the Motor City. This use of iconic realism brings into focus the cultural reality of the U.S. automotive industry and the possibilities associated with innovation and perseverance in any community.

And what vehicle to I drive? Why, a Jeep Liberty, of course!

03 June, 2013

Winged Inspiration


Today
a bee flies wistfully
nectar-gathering for the hive.

Today
a butterfly shares the space
of time and floral beauty,
collecting heavenly nourishment.

Today
The lavender grows more alluring
in service
to its insect guests.

Today
As I view this treasured scene
of serenity and industry,
I am compelled
to make a difference
for Tomorrow.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos

06 March, 2012

The Tiny Hand of Samuel Armas

Photo from Google Images


In 1999, Michael Clancy captured on film the little hand of Samuel Armas, held here by Vanderbilt University Hospital surgeon, Dr. Joseph Bruner. The iconic element here is the hand of the human fetus, for it represents life, innocence, complete vulnerability. This is an excellent example of iconic realism in photography, for one would never think that the connection between a 21 week old human in the womb and a surgeon could physically take place in this manner. One cultural dilemma that this photograph reveals is the debate between abortion and the infant's right to life. Moreover, this photograph brings to mind the limitations and possibilities of medical science as well as the beauty in the touch of a human hand. 

14 February, 2012

Rodin's "The Kiss" and Iconic Realism

Photo of Rodin's The Kiss from Google Images

August Rodin’s The Kiss illustrates an iconic human act of a loving embrace. However, the two individuals do not touch. The significance of this is the key to understanding the iconic realism in this work of art. These two lovers emulate a common, human activity, yet this embrace, sculpted to express lack of physical contact, creates certain dissonance. The message from this careful configuration could be that humanity longs to embrace life fully, as an act of love; however, certain parameters prevent this occurrence. Other possible interpretations may involve a sense of detachment. Regardless of the interpretation, this sculpture exemplifies iconic realism in that there is an iconic structure, placed in a realistic setting that does not conform to the accepting reality of intimacy. Through this juxtaposition, the artist illustrates cultural liberation, an innovation for the era in which it was sculpted.